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» » The tin-pot foreign general and the old iron woman
The tin-pot foreign general and the old iron woman

Author:

Raymond Briggs

Title:

The tin-pot foreign general and the old iron woman

Category:

Literature & Fiction

PDF ebook size:

1428 kb

ePub ebook size:

1353 kb

Fb2 ebook size:

1326 kb

Other book formats:

lrf doc rtf lit

Rating:

4.1

ISBN10:

0241113636

ISBN13:

978-0241113639

Publisher:

H. Hamilton (1984)

Language:

English

Subcategory:

Contemporary

Pages:

48

Buy Hardcover:

Amazon

The tin-pot foreign general and the old iron woman by Raymond Briggs

Fighting over an innocent little island, the ambitious Tin-Pot Foreign General and the greedy Old Iron Woman end up killing hundreds of brave men in a meaningless war.
Marg
A not for children story about the perils and folly of war from the usual writer of children's books, Raymond Briggs. It was a bit jarring to see some of the suggestive imagery rendered in his usual colored pencil sketch style. Gone are the round, soft hued and cuddly forms of the children's characters, replaced with sharp angles and much bolder colors. The rounder shapes are reserved for those who suffer the most in a senseless or pointless war.
Olma
Worth it.
Frosha
Briggs has come up with a clever idea and artwork - wonderful satire. It's of great interest to my students, who are developing their visual literacy skills.
Marad
Raymond Briggs is one of the finest cartoonists that ever lived and an incredibly gifted and natural storyteller. The Snowman is one of the most pure and classic Christmas stories ever, while I'll never forget reading Fungus the Bogeyman when I was a kid and loving every comically grotesque and funny panel. As an adult I rediscovered Briggs by reading When the Wind Blows, a powerful story of the Cold War, and Gentleman Jim, a deceptively simple story of a cleaner. Maybe the best Briggs book though is Ethel and Ernest, the story of Briggs' parents and his tribute to them - simply put, beautiful. If you're not bawling by the end, you're not human. Seriously, if you want to read a comic with bags of heart and elegant art, read that book.

Amidst all of that is Briggs' 1984 classic indictment of the Thatcher Administration and the Falklands conflict, now reprinted in the year of Thatcher's death: The Tin Pot Foreign General and the Old Iron Woman. The Tin Pot General was Argentine General Leopoldo Galtieri and of course Margaret Thatcher was the Old Iron Woman. In less than 50 pages, Briggs satirises the pettiness of the conflict that was the Falklands war while capturing the devastation war brings to those caught up in it.

He switches styles from brash cartoonish satirical wizardry to drawing in quiet pencils to depict the fallen and permanently injured soldiers - it's a haunting sequence and a stark change of pace from the flamboyant way he draws Thatcher and Galtieri. Briggs wrote this as a satire on the Falklands but really it could be about any war. The losers are always ordinary people who are quickly forgotten by those who instigated the conflict in the first place, and pointless wars continue to be waged.

Because of the way Briggs draws Thatcher as kind of like Parker and Stone depict Barbara Streisand in South Park (Mecha Streisand!), robotic with cannons for breasts that open up and spew forth tax money, I wouldn't say this is at all a book suitable for kids. And if not for that, then the muted, devastating way he shows the casualties of war ought to be carefully presented to youngsters as the drawings are quite blunt.

The Tin Pot General and the Old Iron Woman is well worth picking up to remind ourselves of the true cost of war and the true nature of nationalism - it is another defiantly intelligent and brilliant work from the master, Raymond Briggs.
Orevise
Raymond Briggs is one of the finest cartoonists that ever lived and an incredibly gifted and natural storyteller. The Snowman is one of the most pure and classic Christmas stories ever, while I'll never forget reading Fungus the Bogeyman when I was a kid and loving every comically grotesque and funny panel. As an adult I rediscovered Briggs by reading When the Wind Blows, a powerful story of the Cold War, and Gentleman Jim, a deceptively simple story of a cleaner. Maybe the best Briggs book though is Ethel and Ernest, the story of Briggs' parents and his tribute to them - simply put, beautiful. If you're not bawling by the end, you're not human. Seriously, if you want to read a comic with bags of heart and elegant art, read that book.

Amidst all of that is Briggs' 1984 classic indictment of the Thatcher Administration and the Falklands conflict, now reprinted in the year of Thatcher's death: The Tin Pot Foreign General and the Old Iron Woman. The Tin Pot General was Argentine General Leopoldo Galtieri and of course Margaret Thatcher was the Old Iron Woman. In less than 50 pages, Briggs satirises the pettiness of the conflict that was the Falklands war while capturing the devastation war brings to those caught up in it.

He switches styles from brash cartoonish satirical wizardry to drawing in quiet pencils to depict the fallen and permanently injured soldiers - it's a haunting sequence and a stark change of pace from the flamboyant way he draws Thatcher and Galtieri. Briggs wrote this as a satire on the Falklands but really it could be about any war. The losers are always ordinary people who are quickly forgotten by those who instigated the conflict in the first place, and pointless wars continue to be waged.

Because of the way Briggs draws Thatcher as kind of like Parker and Stone depict Barbara Streisand in South Park (Mecha Streisand!), robotic with cannons for breasts that open up and spew forth tax money, I wouldn't say this is at all a book suitable for kids. And if not for that, then the muted, devastating way he shows the casualties of war ought to be carefully presented to youngsters as the drawings are quite blunt.

The Tin Pot General and the Old Iron Woman is well worth picking up to remind ourselves of the true cost of war and the true nature of nationalism - it is another defiantly intelligent and brilliant work from the master, Raymond Briggs.
Dianalmeena
I bought this book just after the Falklands conflict in the mid-80s. I enjoy the artwork of cartoonist/satirist Gerald Scarfe, and this little story book reminded my of his work. It's not by Scarfe, but it uses the same brand of biting humor and grotesque imagery to good effect. It was designed like a children's book, but it's a children's story for adults. Regrettably, my copy was misplaced in a move, so all I have are the memories of this poignant tale from the Thatcher Era.
Malak
The book itself was a classic of its kind - an excellent parody of the Falklands War.
I honestly don't understand how a book like this can be considered "suitable" for children. The pictures are rather pornographic! The woman shoots bullets from her breasts and there's a 2-page spread of her sitting ... well ... spread-eagle. I thought it was a tad too sexual for children.


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